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Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)
dramatically since the ryan selection, since medicare, bill clinton's arguments on medicare at the convention, it became central to the discussion, there's been a big shift towards obama in that category. >> this doesn't take medicare off the table. we still have to deal with this. >> you're exactly right. medicare and medicaid are unchecked going to cripple this country. we saw erskine bowles earlier this week in chicago, tom, and i said erskine, isn't it the truth that medicare and medicaid by itself is going to consume every cent that the federal government takes in in 20 years? he said no, that's not true. he said, it's doing it right now. he said, this year alone, in the fiscal year that just ended, every dime the federal government got went to pay medicare, medicaid, social security and interest on the debt. that means everything else that on outside of medicare, medicaid, social security and interest on the debt, we borrowed from china. we borrowed from the saudis, we borrowed. we went deeper in debt. that's unsustainable. and the fact that we're not having that discussion in this camp
. >> brian: they are going with the one statement that bill clinton it was so bad when he took over, even i couldn't turn the economy around in four years. >> when you talk to economists, never before has there been so much stimulus, particularly monetary system will, fed printing money. the only why that is happening, i wish bill clinton would use his common sense. the fiscal side of the coin, the side controlled by the white house. that side is scaring businesses. when you threaten them with taxes, you threaten them with more spending, with obamacare, they ratchet back and they don't hire people. >> eric: when they don't hire maybe they don't give people raises. that is part of the reason. its consumer driven economy? >> partially, yes. you have to talk to business people about it. they react non-political. they are not tea party activists. they are moderately conservative. they are scared about the future because they are scared about what is coming out of washington. they are not scared because of tax cuts but they are scared because regulation is going to increase and obamacare and som
the tax rates in the united states, where they were during the bill clinton administration in '90s when the economy was doing just fine. what's wrong with that argument? >> nothing. but -- you need to do -- if you are going go down that path you have do that over time. can't do that cold turkey. i mean, that's just too much of a hit for our after-tax income. particularly in the context of what is still a very weak economy. if you want to go down that path, again, i don't think we need to, between don't need to see tax rates rise that much. if you want to go down that path, only way to make logical sense of that is phase that in over time so people can digest that and wouldn't push us back into a recession. i don't think we need go down that path. we need tax revenue, we need to see additional tax revenues generated. we don't need to see that much general rayed. that would be counter-produce. >> what if they let the taxes lapse for the wealthiest americans which is what president obama wanted those families making more than $250,000 a year, individuals making more than $200,000 a year, w
president was down nine points in mid-september and was tied with bill clinton by the end of october. the clinton eventually won. former clinton pollster is questioning the assumptions being made in today's polls. >> these polls are assuming that you have the same high level of african-american, latino and young people vote in 2012 that you had in 2008. >> obama campaign senior advisor david axelrod said they widely vary so when they all pointed in one direction, they are all wrong. but we are planning for a close race as we always have. another democratic strategist offered this assessment. >> the race isn't over. this can move back three or four times between now and november 6th. >> romney you try to create that momentum. >> of the eight presidential races where the leads were cut or flipped by the opponent, average of comebacks was roughly 35% and in some cases it was the debate that moved the needle. >> gregg: as a reminder we are daig days away from that first presidential debate. we'll have live coverage of the event hosted by megyn kelly and bret baier. that is coming up righ
of israel on an issue frankly was not relevant, which was settlements. and i don't think, unlike bill clinton, and george w. bush, that this president has the kind of emotional sensitivity that think is required to create some measure of partnership with the israelis even though netanyahu is a difficult guy. on syria, look, let's be clear. we're coming off the two longest wars in american history. the last thing we need is another military adventure that isn't thought through very clearly. on iran, no matter who is president we have got big trouble coming. israelis rightly need to figure out a way to prevent iran from enriching uranium. the question is, whether or not you can do that short of war? and right now, neither barack obama nor mitt romney, nor benjamin netanyahu have answers to that. so --. >> brought us through some very important regions in the middle east and it is such a big topic, i would like to drill down and return to one of the things you pointed out. the difference between being smart and stupid when it comes to foreign policy let's talk about priorities especially
place than we currently are? was bill clinton right during the democratic national convention when he said no one, no president, could have had this type of recovery and dealt with it, republican or democrat. >>guest: the problem with that line that this is the best we can do, always played the clips, that was president obama, and vice president biden and so many of the economists who told us four years ago we are going to get out of this mess and we will have a very robust recovery. i just shows the clip and president obama said he would be a one-termer if things are not turned around. have we turned things around? it is dicey. if you look at what happened this week with the g.d.p. numbers that came out, very weak, 1.3 percent growth. that is a third of where we should be. we have $5 trillion in debt. the deficit has not been cut in half. instead, it has actually doubled. when president came in it was $500 billion and now it is $1 trillion. the theme of the re-election campaign could be promises made, promises broken. >> the argument is this recession is different than any we have se
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)